a picture of an artistic display of classic gothic literature including two small paper models of creepy haunted-type houses

Classic Creepers

Image of two photos of a large gothic book display on the window ledge in the fiction section at the library

GOTHIC. It’s not just a personal statement or architecture. The literary genre was first made famous by Horace Walpole’s THE CASTLE OF OTRANTO in 1764. The genre became cemented in culture by Anne Radcliffe’s numerous writings at the end of that century. 19th century Gothic was reinterpreted by the infamous Poe and revived by more recognizable titles such as Shelley’s FRANKENSTEIN, Stevenson’s DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE, and Emily Bronte’s WUTHERING HEIGHTS. Characterized by strange, mysterious, or threatening settings; an exaggerated sense of the supernatural; clashes between the contemporary and the archaic; and packed with uncanny and sublime moments: Gothic literature is a perfect pairing to these chilling evenings. If you need help deciding where to start, we have a printed top-100 list of favorite Gothic novels setting next to the display in the fiction section.

Image of two photos of a large gothic book display on the window ledge in the fiction section at the library

Old school goth not your style? Maybe some MODERN GOTHIC novels will do the trick. Try one of these:

THE GOTHIC SAGA (5 books), by Joyce Carol Oates
THE HAUNTING OF HILL HOUSE, by Shirley Jackson
WHITE IS FOR WITCHING, by Helen Oyeyemi
THE HANDMAID’S TALE, by Margaret Atwood
THE DISTANT HOURS, by Kate Morton
THE THIRTEENTH TALE, by Diane Setterfield
(anything) by Daphne de Maurier
THE PRESTIGE, by Christopher Priest
THE PIANO TEACHER, by Janice Y.K. Lee
RUSTICATION, by Charles Pallister