Stranger Books

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After you’ve binged watched the new season of Stranger Things, why not give some strange books a try: GOTHIC. It’s not just a personal statement or architecture. The literary genre was first made famous by Horace Walpole’s  THE CASTLE OF OTRANTO in 1764.  It then became cemented in culture by Anne Radcliffe’s numerous writings at the end of that century.  19th century Gothic was reinterpreted by the infamous Poe and revived by more recognizable titles such as Shelley’s  FRANKENSTEIN, Stevenson’s DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE, and Emily Bronte’s WUTHERING HEIGHTS.  Characterized by strange, mysterious, or threatening settings, an exaggerated sense of the supernatural, clashes between the contemporary and the archaic, and packed with uncanny and sublime moments; Gothic literature is a perfect pairing to these chilling evenings.

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Old school goth not your style? Your loss, I guess. Maybe some MODERN GOTHIC novels will do the trick.  Try one of these:

THE GOTHIC SAGA (5 books), by Joyce Carol Oates
*see here for all the titles
THE HAUNTING OF HILL HOUSE, by Shirley Jackson
WHITE IS FOR WITCHING, by Helen Oyeyemi
THE HANDMAID’S TALE, by Margaret Atwood
THE DISTANT HOURS, by Kate Morton
THE THIRTEENTH TALE, by Diane Setterfield
(anything) by Daphne de Maurier
THE PRESTIGE, by Christopher Priest
THE PIANO TEACHER, by Janice Y.K. Lee
RUSTICATION, by Charles Pallister

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In case neither classic nor modern Gothic just can’t dish out the heebie jeebies like you crave: there’s always the horrific. Stephen King basically has his own shelf here, and we’ve held on to some other classic stories of horror as well like THE EXORCIST, ROSEMARY’S BABY, and THE SILENCE OF THE LAMBS.  Be freaked away.