Category Archives: Quotes

Travel Vicariously with January’s Book Club Selection

Join the Riverbend Readers Tuesday, January 24th at 6pm to discuss the book TURN RIGHT AT MACHU PICCHU: Rediscovering the Lost City One Step at a Time.

Author Mark Adams has spent his career editing adventure and travel magazines, but decides to take it up a notch by investigating and retracing the steps of one Hiram Bingham III — the original discoverer of the now famous citadel in the Andes Mountains, Machu Picchu.

“For the first time since dropping out of graduate school, I remembered an unpleasant weekend spent struggling to comprehend the philosopher Immanuel Kant’s explanation of the difference between calling something beautiful and calling it sublime. Nowadays, we throw around the word ‘sublime’ to describe gooey desserts or overpriced handbags.  In Kant’s epistemology it meant something limitless, an aesthetically pleasing entity so huge that it made the perceiver’s head hurt.  Machu Picchu isn’t just beautiful, it’s sublime.”

As always, many copies are available for extended borrowing at the library.

For Days Long Ago . . .

Please be reminded that the library will be CLOSED this Saturday for New Year’s Eve.

image that reads "Auld Lang Syne -by Robert Burns

And in order to assist any fellow parties (or maybe more appropriately: partyers), who like myself have always wondered what the actual words to “that-song-people-in-movies-sometimes-sing-on-New Year’s Eve”, the entire  lyrics to this infamous Scottish tune/ poem are as follows:
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
     And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
     And auld lang syne!

     Chorus: 
     For auld lang syne, my dear,
     For auld lang syne.
     We’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet,
     For auld lang syne.

And surely ye’ll be your pint stowp!
     And surely I’ll be mine!
And we’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet,
     For auld lang syne.

     Chorus

We twa hae run about the braes,
     And pou’d the gowans fine;
But we’ve wander’d mony a weary fit,
     Sin’ auld lang syne.

     Chorus

We twa hae paidl’d in the burn,
     Frae morning sun till dine;
But seas between us braid hae roar’d
     Sin’ auld lang syne.

     Chorus

And there’s a hand, my trusty fere!
     And gie’s a hand o’ thine!
And we’ll tak a right gude-willie waught,
     For auld lang syne.

 

Closed for the New Year

Hope you enjoy the New Year Festivities! We will be closed Thursday and Friday: See ya Next Year!

picture of the front cover of a vintage book entitled "Ring Out Wild Bells", referring to the poem by Alfred Lord Tennyson
Ring out the old, ring in the new,
   Ring, happy bells, across the snow:
   The year is going, let him go;
Ring out the false, ring in the true.
Ring out the grief that saps the mind
   For those that here we see no more;
   Ring out the feud of rich and poor,
Ring in redress to all mankind.
Ring out a slowly dying cause,
   And ancient forms of party strife;
   Ring in the nobler modes of life,
With sweeter manners, purer laws.
Ring out the want, the care, the sin,
   The faithless coldness of the times;
   Ring out, ring out my mournful rhymes
But ring the fuller minstrel in.
Ring out false pride in place and blood,
   The civic slander and the spite;
   Ring in the love of truth and right,
Ring in the common love of good.
Ring out old shapes of foul disease;
   Ring out the narrowing lust of gold;
   Ring out the thousand wars of old,
Ring in the thousand years of peace.
Ring in the valiant man and free,
   The larger heart, the kindlier hand;
   Ring out the darkness of the land,
Ring in the Christ that is to be.

Alfred, Lord Tennyson